admin
1156 posts
TimePosted 22/08/2006 10:21:00
admin says

Burning Question 1

Our clinker chemical composition is as follows: SiO2= 21 per cent; CaO= 64 per cent; Al2O3 = 6.0 per cent; Fe2O3= 5.2 ; K2O = 0.4 per cent; SO3 = 0.55 per cent; MgO =1.0 per cent; Free CaO = 1.0 per cent and the liquid = 34.5 per cent. Liter Wt 1380g/ l. If there is slight reduction in the liquid the clinker becomes dusty though the free CaO is under control. Here it seems the Al2O3 comes from limestone does not get into liquid though the calculated liquid is high.If slight reduction in Fe2O3 content results in dusty clinker. We add aluminous laterite and hematite ore as fluxes. The question is how to differentiate between the actual liquid and calculated liquid.Does the optical microscopy help in this regard? From your experience give a clear picture on how to reduce the liquid content with improved nodulisation and to have better refractory life in the burning zone. Even the Spinel bricks give only( refra mag-85 of refratecnik) six month's life.

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admin
1156 posts
TimePosted 22/08/2006 10:21:00
admin says

Re: Burning

You are correct the theoretical liquid content of your clinker is very high. The litre weight is also high indicating a very dense (almost fused) clinker. Some Al2O3 will undoubtedly be taken into solid solution in the alite phase. Optical microscopy can indeed tell you the true liquid content (and the true alite, belite and free CaO content). There are photographic and computer pattern recognition systems available that will do this for you and eliminate the variation between microscopists. With regard to refractory life the liquid content and its properties are important. The viscosity of the flux is a critical consideration. Too fluid a flux can lead to dusting. These inter-relationships are very complex. To answer your questions properly would require a full and detailed process investigation involving microscopic analysis of frequent samples coupled with detailed process data over an extended period.

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admin
1156 posts
TimePosted 22/08/2006 10:21:00
admin says

Burning Question 2

How can we reduce the clinker size -5mm >35 per cent (existing), we want to reduce to under 20 per cent. Our plant is a 1Mta capacity unit. Fuel is petcoke 70 per cent balance Indian coal.

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admin
1156 posts
TimePosted 22/08/2006 10:21:00
admin says

Re: Burning

The only way to change the clinker size will be to change the kiln feed chemistry or the operation of the kiln. To have less fines in the clinker you should try to increase the flux content by reducing the silica modulus. Alternatively adjust the rotational speed of the kiln by slowing slightly to increase the residence time.

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